May 26, 2019, 04:05:41 PM

Author Topic: Mark's Movie Reviews  (Read 16818 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline marklawrence

  • Administrator
  • HOF Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3030
  • Karma: +44/-12
Re: Mark's Movie Reviews
« Reply #135 on: May 08, 2019, 05:40:24 AM »
Thus is my f ing movie reviews. Take your politics somewhere else.
“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” -- John F. Kennedy.

Online ricky

  • HOF Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5910
  • Karma: +42/-19
Re: Mark's Movie Reviews
« Reply #136 on: May 08, 2019, 11:22:57 AM »
Thus is my f ing movie reviews. Take your politics somewhere else.

OK. Your thread, your site, your rules.
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Offline marklawrence

  • Administrator
  • HOF Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3030
  • Karma: +44/-12
Re: Mark's Movie Reviews
« Reply #137 on: May 10, 2019, 04:06:04 PM »
Vertigo

Perhaps Alfred Hitchcock's best film, Vertigo was made in 1958. I had never seen a Hitchcock film, I wanted to see what the fuss was all about.

Special effects are, um, quaint. Our modern eyes pick up the blue screen easily, and the graphics are, well, lets just say historical. There's a break in movies, everything before Indiana Jones was paced slowly, glacially by today's standards, pretty much everything after is turbocharged and shifted up two gears. When 2001 came out I saw it in the theater and thought it was quite exciting. Today it still holds up as a great movie, but it could be edited down to 45 minutes and you wouldn't miss much. The special effects were a girl walking upside down and 12 minutes that were drawn on a full color etch-a-sketch. It could be combined with 2010, together they would make one good modern movie. I leave it to you to decide if that means the old pacing was too slow, or modern people have the attention span of chipmunks on meth. Could be both. . .

That said, Vertigo was actually quite enjoyable. Jimmy Stewart gave a good performance, although apparently Hitchcock didn't agree, as previous to this film he was Alfred's fave and after this file they never worked together again. At the time it was slightly scandalous that Stewart was twice Novac's age, and some thought Jimmy seemed, well, old and tired. Actually he kinda did.

Jimmy is terrified of heights, an important part of the plot and ultimately the title of the movie. Jimmy is hired by a friend to tail the friend's wife, Novac, 'cause he says she's being taken over by the spirit of her great-grandmother and behaving weirdly. Jimmy tails her and finds things extremely confusing. Kim Novac did a great job playing (sorta) two parts.

The movie unfolds in a completely unexpected direction with a quite surprising ending. It's said you can tell a lot about Hitchcock's fears and loves from this film - I dunno about that, I'm better at physics than reading director's childhoods from their movies.

If this thread has a moral, it's "movies are like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're going to get." This chocolate was nice.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 04:09:20 PM by marklawrence »
“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” -- John F. Kennedy.

Online ricky

  • HOF Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5910
  • Karma: +42/-19
Re: Mark's Movie Reviews
« Reply #138 on: May 10, 2019, 06:23:09 PM »
"Vertigo" is now the best film ever made, according to some critics polls. Whatever. He was at his height during this time, with "North by Northwest", the remake of "The Man Who Knew Too Much", "Psycho" (which I saw at the local movie theater when I was 10), "Rear Window" and even "The Birds". There is a lot to make "Vertigo" so good- going onto YouTube and typing the name into the search box will get you a lot of hits. And the guy never won an Oscar for best director.
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Offline Bignutz

  • HOF Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 704
  • Karma: +11/-1
Re: Mark's Movie Reviews
« Reply #139 on: May 14, 2019, 11:00:51 PM »
Vertigo

Perhaps Alfred Hitchcock's best film, Vertigo was made in 1958. I had never seen a Hitchcock film, I wanted to see what the fuss was all about.

Special effects are, um, quaint. Our modern eyes pick up the blue screen easily, and the graphics are, well, lets just say historical. There's a break in movies, everything before Indiana Jones was paced slowly, glacially by today's standards, pretty much everything after is turbocharged and shifted up two gears. When 2001 came out I saw it in the theater and thought it was quite exciting. Today it still holds up as a great movie, but it could be edited down to 45 minutes and you wouldn't miss much. The special effects were a girl walking upside down and 12 minutes that were drawn on a full color etch-a-sketch. It could be combined with 2010, together they would make one good modern movie. I leave it to you to decide if that means the old pacing was too slow, or modern people have the attention span of chipmunks on meth. Could be both. . .

That said, Vertigo was actually quite enjoyable. Jimmy Stewart gave a good performance, although apparently Hitchcock didn't agree, as previous to this film he was Alfred's fave and after this file they never worked together again. At the time it was slightly scandalous that Stewart was twice Novac's age, and some thought Jimmy seemed, well, old and tired. Actually he kinda did.

Jimmy is terrified of heights, an important part of the plot and ultimately the title of the movie. Jimmy is hired by a friend to tail the friend's wife, Novac, 'cause he says she's being taken over by the spirit of her great-grandmother and behaving weirdly. Jimmy tails her and finds things extremely confusing. Kim Novac did a great job playing (sorta) two parts.

The movie unfolds in a completely unexpected direction with a quite surprising ending. It's said you can tell a lot about Hitchcock's fears and loves from this film - I dunno about that, I'm better at physics than reading director's childhoods from their movies.

If this thread has a moral, it's "movies are like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're going to get." This chocolate was nice.


Checkout North by Northwest and Rear Window. For a laugh, High Anxiety, Mel Brooks parody of Hitchcock films.
“What’s going on out there”

Online ricky

  • HOF Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5910
  • Karma: +42/-19
Re: Mark's Movie Reviews
« Reply #140 on: May 15, 2019, 02:40:35 PM »
Finally saw "Us" because it came to the budget cinema- less than $2 to see this movie. Well, I went home and immediately went to YouTube to have an analysis of the film help me understand the film. It's a horror movie, but mainly allegorical with a twist ending. Peele is an interesting director/writer, but he may be getting a bit too self-important. This movie was alternatively scary, but also confusing and was too involved in subtly analyzing the contemporary American social structure. But at the end, I was going, what did I just see here? Is it important, or just pretentious? I'll give Peele the benefit of a doubt, but the weirdness factor in this film is about an 8/10 (to see a film that is definitely "off the rails", check out "Holy Motors". On a weirdness scale, it scores a solid 11. Or maybe 12.)
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Offline marklawrence

  • Administrator
  • HOF Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3030
  • Karma: +44/-12
Re: Mark's Movie Reviews
« Reply #141 on: May 19, 2019, 09:42:01 PM »
John wick 3: parabellum

More. More senseless. More gratuitous. More violence.

John was an assassin, but got out cause he got one of Brady's leftovers. But then some Russian punk stole his car and shot his dog.  So, lots of running around and finally he kills the Russian punk. That's part 1.

Then daddy comes after him.  Lotsa mayhem, finally he kills daddy. But he kills him in the hotel where business can't be conducted. Wick is now png. That's part 2.

Now the entire criminal underworld is after him. Every assassin in the entire world wants wick and the $15m bounty. He had to kill a seemingly endless string of thugs. That's part 3. I've left out stunningly little of the plot.

The fight scenes weren't even that good mostly.  And, i gotta say, when you're a part of the thug army and you see hundreds of your buddy's bite the dust, with the one single target more or less unhurt, don't you check out at some point?

OTOH, it did knock avengers out of the top spot, so that's something.

“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” -- John F. Kennedy.

Offline marklawrence

  • Administrator
  • HOF Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3030
  • Karma: +44/-12
Re: Mark's Movie Reviews
« Reply #142 on: Today at 07:30:12 AM »
The Man Without a Face

There just aren't many new movies I'm interested in right now, so I'm doing some older movies.

Starring and directed by Mel Gibson, 1993.

Gibson plays Justin McLeod, a recluse who was once a teacher. McLeod has been burned, badly, over half his body and half his face. Chuck Norstadt is a local boy being raised by a narcissistic mother who, by the end of the movie, is on husband #6. He also lives with his hateful older sister and a younger sister that's more or less human. Chuck desperately wants to go to a military academy and escape the horrible women, but can't pass the entrance exam. He meets McLeod and a strange friendship begins as McLeod tutors him in latin, geometry and digging and filling in large holes. Right at the start we see Chuck's problems with the women in his life; as the movie progresses we learn McLeod's back story and why he's burned, not working and a recluse.

Excellent movie. Find it on Amazon, Hulu, Moviefone, Directv, or stream it on 123movies.com or putlocker.fyi.
“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” -- John F. Kennedy.