September 19, 2019, 04:23:23 PM

Author Topic: Josh Jones wants to be Traded...NOW RELEASED!!  (Read 6551 times)

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Offline Hands

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #75 on: June 19, 2019, 10:37:31 AM »
Here is what I don't understand....you learn to play a certain way in sports. That doesn't change as you get older and play more advanced level of play. RT, there is no way possible JJ played like that in college, so why do it now when it counts? Can't figure it out.
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Offline RT

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #76 on: June 19, 2019, 11:45:46 AM »
The HaHa Clinton-Dix thing of playing not to get hurt so you can collect on the big second contract. HaHa was Josh's mentor on that line of thinking, but what neither one of them grasp was that you need to perform well to get paid well. You would think HaHa being shutout in FA would turn the light on for the two of them, but maybe not. Who would of ever thought 3 years ago that Adrian Amos would get paid in FA and Clinton-Dix wouldn't. Are you paying attention Josh Jones? Here is a crazy concept, play hard and do your job and you will get paid. 

Online craig

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #77 on: June 20, 2019, 08:51:49 AM »
Everybody is wired differently.  You guys in the Green Bay area probably have connections and people who know people and have sometimes direct or indirect insights into personalities and inside dynamics.  As a distance guy, of course I don't.  I can't really guess what the internal fires are that burn in a man's heart and drive his decisions; and some guys don't really seem to have much fire that burns very brightly at all, or drives them to consistently give max effort. 

I listened through the locker-room interviews from last week, Jones included.  I thought his interview was reasonable.  As he said, he omitted the voluntary, which were voluntary.  I think it's a bit unfair to fault a guy too much for not doing something voluntary!  He said he's got a new baby and as a family man he wanted to stay home, and that he loves his trainer at home. 

My hope is that none of this negativity about Jones ends up making any difference or having any carryover, and that he plays hard and plays well for us. 

It was kinda obvious in the interview that he was a more hostile and snarly interview than other guys.  Adams, Lane Taylor, Geronimo, Martinez, Davis, Bakhti, so many positive, nice, likable, sincere guys.  Jones much more snarly and touchy.  Although perhaps understandably, because he's getting more provocative questions that would naturally put a guy more on the defensive. 

We'll see how it goes.  Hopefully that snarly combativeness plays out as a really active and effective defender.  And obviously guys can have totally different personalities with media than they do within the team. 

Offline dannobanano

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #78 on: June 20, 2019, 01:15:22 PM »
I said it before and I'll say it again.

Jones is only hurting himself and his career. Skipping OTA's is not unforgivable, but the optics ("me first" rather than "team first") puts him in a somewhat negative light.

Add in that he "hurt his hammy" in his pre-mini camp training regimen, and it adds to the negative optics.

Typically you can find other team members who will support players who choose to skip/stay away from team events, like OTA's. But I had a hard time finding anyone who stood with Josh Jones is seeking what he is seeking.

Tramon Williams was about the only one who had anything to say about Josh Jones.

https://247sports.com/nfl/green-bay-packers/Article/Tramon-Williams-Josh-Jones-trade-request-reaction-132238597/

[But Williams also knows every player in the locker room has to do what's best for him, his family and his future. So when he was asked about the situation going on with safety Josh Jones, he understood what he was going through. However, Williams also knows it's all about the team whenever you step out on the field and in the locker room.
"I mean, I think anybody can understand the frustration, but also got to understand that anytime you step in this building, it's always team first," Williams said after the Packers open organized team activity session this week.
"It's always going to be team first," So as long as you're not in this building, I think you'll hurt yourself. But whenever you're in this building, it's always team first. But I do understand his frustration, and as a player, you have to do what you have to do. You have to some degree look out for yourself. I'll say this one more time: when you're in this building, it's always team first."]

Offline RT

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #79 on: June 21, 2019, 04:16:00 AM »
It is interesting that not a single person spoke up on Jones behalf and tried to just smooth it over. Probably tells us all we need to know about the situation.

Craig you state that you thought his interview was reasonable, yet a few sentences later you say he was 'more hostile and snarly'. So hostile and snarly are reasonable? I watched the same interview and saw a guy who was defiant, stubborn and obstinate. I saw no signs of a guy who has any interest in showing up and being a team guy. It would be very surprising to me if he ended up a positive asset for the Packers in any way this coming season.   

Offline B

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #80 on: July 26, 2019, 09:23:46 PM »
But the third-year pro reported to training camp as expected and lined-up at safety with the second-team defense and at inside linebacker with the number one nickel unit.
The Green Bay Packers never lost a football game.
They just ran out of time.
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Online ricky

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #81 on: July 27, 2019, 12:29:17 PM »
Will he make the cut to the 53? If not, then he gets his wish: the ability to sign with any team that wants him. If he is on the 53, then he can either be a problem, or he can play to the best of his abilities and hopefully increase his value as a player. Or, he can fake an injury, ala McKenzie, and spend the year on IR. And go through this scenario again next year, a year older, and more damaged in the eyes of the league.
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Online ricky

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #82 on: July 31, 2019, 01:11:27 PM »
Well, this is certainly an interesting turn of events. Jones has seemingly "gotten religion" and is eager to become the best player he can- for the Packers. As he said, the past is the past, he's living in the present. So, something has happened to make him change his tune. So, time to put all this behind us also, and welcome him back, and hope he brings a new attitude and commitment to become the best player he can. Then, when his contract is up, he can always become a FA and go for big bucks.

https://cheeseheadtv.com/blog/a-change-of-tune-leaves-jones-back-in-the-heart-of-packers-defense-247
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Offline Shinesman

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #83 on: July 31, 2019, 09:00:10 PM »
Then he got booted from practice today apparently. Not sure what his deal is.
"Tradition! Just because we've always done it that way, doesn't mean that it isn't incredibly stupid."

Offline B

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #84 on: July 31, 2019, 09:15:41 PM »
New culture, new rules. He was retaliating for what he took as a cheap shot at Brown... under McCarthy fights were tolerated. The new sheriff played down the law on his zero tolerance for fighting in practice. Could have been anyone - Josh put a spot light on himself this offseason, which makrs this seem like a bigger deal than it probably is.
The Green Bay Packers never lost a football game.
They just ran out of time.
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Online craig

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #85 on: July 31, 2019, 09:30:17 PM »
Agree, Bruce, could have been anybody.  Still, coach had stated what the new law was.  So could have been anybody who chose not to listen or didn't have the self-discipline to comply.  But apparently it wasn't anybody; it was Jones. 

I'm very pleased that coaches have talked about wanting to be both disciplined and smart, and have mentioned that specifically in regards to special teams.  I've sometimes felt that for every 10-yard punt return we'd have, we'd have three clippings or personal fouls that went backwards.  I'd love to see the special teams guys have a culture where 15-yard-penalties are not normal and acceptable and viewed as being heroically tough.   

Offline The GM

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #86 on: August 01, 2019, 11:51:20 AM »
Will he make the cut to the 53? If not, then he gets his wish: the ability to sign with any team that wants him. If he is on the 53, then he can either be a problem, or he can play to the best of his abilities and hopefully increase his value as a player. Or, he can fake an injury, ala McKenzie, and spend the year on IR. And go through this scenario again next year, a year older, and more damaged in the eyes of the league.

This is a new type of player today.  Not all players,  but for a growing number its not about winning or giving effort (Unless you are a long shot make the team).  Its about longevity.  Saving your body, and playing longer.  Whatever you do, dont get hurt.  Do the least amount of contact you can.    Guys like HHCD ran away from plays, gave half effort, but will get paid again by his third team.  At the end of the your career, you walk away with a chunk of change,  and no major battle scars.  This isnt your dad's NFL any longer, its much more of a business by players.  Games like the Pro Bowl used to be a pride filled game, now its a line dance contest, and party.  Times, they are a changin.         

Online ricky

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #87 on: August 01, 2019, 02:35:38 PM »
This is a new type of player today.  Not all players,  but for a growing number its not about winning or giving effort (Unless you are a long shot make the team).  Its about longevity.  Saving your body, and playing longer.  Whatever you do, dont get hurt.  Do the least amount of contact you can.    Guys like HHCD ran away from plays, gave half effort, but will get paid again by his third team.  At the end of the your career, you walk away with a chunk of change,  and no major battle scars.  This isnt your dad's NFL any longer, its much more of a business by players.  Games like the Pro Bowl used to be a pride filled game, now its a line dance contest, and party.  Times, they are a changin.       

It's always been a business. And a very one-sided business at that. Players were to tied to a team until the team decided whether they should be cut, traded or were so battered they could no longer function. And it's not as if those guys were paid a lot of money. Here's an excerpt:

Sep 10, 2017 - The average football player's salary in 1969 of $25,000 would be equivalent to about $156,400 adjusted—far lower than the actual $1.9 million average salary of today's NFL athletes.

Sure, these guys know it's a business, and make business decisions. And yes, some of these guys do the least possible. But then again, Deion Sanders was well known for avoiding contact. But he was an elite returner, and one of the best coverage players in NFL history. Meanwhile, the guys on the front lines- the linemen, RB's, LBers. TE's, etc.- have no choice. Contact is the name of the game. Has the game changed? Yes. Is it safer? Incrementally. But it is still an extremely physically demanding sport. No one comes out of the game after even a short career without having physical effects that last a lifetime. That these guys choose to put their bodies through this kind of physical mayhem year after year simply amazes me. They earn every penny they make.
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Offline Shinesman

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #88 on: August 01, 2019, 08:54:42 PM »
This is a new type of player today.  Not all players,  but for a growing number its not about winning or giving effort (Unless you are a long shot make the team).  Its about longevity.  Saving your body, and playing longer.  Whatever you do, dont get hurt.  Do the least amount of contact you can.    Guys like HHCD ran away from plays, gave half effort, but will get paid again by his third team.  At the end of the your career, you walk away with a chunk of change,  and no major battle scars.  This isnt your dad's NFL any longer, its much more of a business by players.  Games like the Pro Bowl used to be a pride filled game, now its a line dance contest, and party.  Times, they are a changin.       

It's always been a business. And a very one-sided business at that. Players were to tied to a team until the team decided whether they should be cut, traded or were so battered they could no longer function. And it's not as if those guys were paid a lot of money. Here's an excerpt:

Sep 10, 2017 - The average football player's salary in 1969 of $25,000 would be equivalent to about $156,400 adjusted—far lower than the actual $1.9 million average salary of today's NFL athletes.

Sure, these guys know it's a business, and make business decisions. And yes, some of these guys do the least possible. But then again, Deion Sanders was well known for avoiding contact. But he was an elite returner, and one of the best coverage players in NFL history. Meanwhile, the guys on the front lines- the linemen, RB's, LBers. TE's, etc.- have no choice. Contact is the name of the game. Has the game changed? Yes. Is it safer? Incrementally. But it is still an extremely physically demanding sport. No one comes out of the game after even a short career without having physical effects that last a lifetime. That these guys choose to put their bodies through this kind of physical mayhem year after year simply amazes me. They earn every penny they make.

They also make way more than the average worker. Many of them are top tier earners in this country. They get compensated very well. If they don't like the millions a year, they can always walk away and start a different business or career. These players complain a lot for doing stuff they have known was risky for years. And they get paid a damn ton of cash. So I just think many of them have become greedy. Lots of people do more dangerous jobs for a fraction of the salary.
"Tradition! Just because we've always done it that way, doesn't mean that it isn't incredibly stupid."

Offline dannobanano

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Re: Josh Jones wants to be Traded?
« Reply #89 on: August 02, 2019, 04:29:46 AM »
This is a new type of player today.  Not all players,  but for a growing number its not about winning or giving effort (Unless you are a long shot make the team).  Its about longevity.  Saving your body, and playing longer.  Whatever you do, dont get hurt.  Do the least amount of contact you can.    Guys like HHCD ran away from plays, gave half effort, but will get paid again by his third team.  At the end of the your career, you walk away with a chunk of change,  and no major battle scars.  This isnt your dad's NFL any longer, its much more of a business by players.  Games like the Pro Bowl used to be a pride filled game, now its a line dance contest, and party.  Times, they are a changin.       

It's always been a business. And a very one-sided business at that. Players were to tied to a team until the team decided whether they should be cut, traded or were so battered they could no longer function. And it's not as if those guys were paid a lot of money. Here's an excerpt:

Sep 10, 2017 - The average football player's salary in 1969 of $25,000 would be equivalent to about $156,400 adjusted—far lower than the actual $1.9 million average salary of today's NFL athletes.

Sure, these guys know it's a business, and make business decisions. And yes, some of these guys do the least possible. But then again, Deion Sanders was well known for avoiding contact. But he was an elite returner, and one of the best coverage players in NFL history. Meanwhile, the guys on the front lines- the linemen, RB's, LBers. TE's, etc.- have no choice. Contact is the name of the game. Has the game changed? Yes. Is it safer? Incrementally. But it is still an extremely physically demanding sport. No one comes out of the game after even a short career without having physical effects that last a lifetime. That these guys choose to put their bodies through this kind of physical mayhem year after year simply amazes me. They earn every penny they make.

They also make way more than the average worker. Many of them are top tier earners in this country. They get compensated very well. If they don't like the millions a year, they can always walk away and start a different business or career. These players complain a lot for doing stuff they have known was risky for years. And they get paid a damn ton of cash. So I just think many of them have become greedy. Lots of people do more dangerous jobs for a fraction of the salary.

Way true shine.

Farming, construction, law enforcement/fire fighters, etc etc
(My son is a welder for large construction projects, so I personally know the risks)

JMHO, but it’s the “entertainment factor” that drives the “getting paid” narrative in pro sports.

Almost all pro athletes are at risk for career ending injury, but so too are working people like my son. Except my son isn’t in the entertainment business.

I still love sports and my Packers, but I have little sympathy for the “dangerous career” argument.