September 17, 2019, 09:54:01 PM

Author Topic: RIP Bart Starr  (Read 937 times)

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Offline MrJuly4th

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Online B

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2019, 09:56:47 AM »
One of the nicest and most generous guys one could ever hope to meet. He was a great leader and football player, but first and foremost he was a great man.

I will always appreciate his wisdom and patience with my brothers and me when we were young. Deepest condolences to   his family.
The Green Bay Packers never lost a football game.
They just ran out of time.
-Vince Lombardi

Offline dannobanano

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2019, 10:21:05 AM »
Amen B!

Starr's work after football has left just as much a mark as his work in football, maybe even more.   https://www.rawhide.org/

Starr and Nitschke were my all time favorite players/people.

Got to meet Ray in the early 90's in Burlington, WI at a city festival.

In his early years he was very rough around the edges, but in his later years became a very gracious man and big time Packers ambassador.

I have to think that Bart maybe "wore off" on Ray a little bit as time went by.

Rest In Peace, Mr. Starr.

Offline Bignutz

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2019, 10:22:59 AM »
 :'(

One of my childhood hero’s.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2019, 10:23:40 AM by Bignutz »
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Offline Gregg

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2019, 06:45:20 PM »
I agree with all the above.

What a good guy and what a modest guy he was.  He won five NFL championships.

But he referred to himself as just a spoke in the wheel.  Pretty important spoke though.  His record in post season was simply first rate.  What a great TD to interception ratio he had in those games.   And those were under the old rules where your OL could extend their hands, DB's could bump and run all over, and DL could decapitate a QB and not get roughing called on them.

 Starr told that story about the team's first meeting with Lombardi.  Recall, this was after they went 1-10-1 under Scooter McLean. Lombardi closed by saying, they would strive for perfection, knowing it could not be attained. But they would catch excellence.  He was not interested in being just good. After that meeting, Starr ran out the door, called his wife and said, "Honey,we're going to start winning now!"   He got that right. He and his wife were later visited by Lombardi at their home after they had won like 3 championships.  Before he left Vince looked around and said, nice place.  His wife said, it was you who got this for us. 

About his coaching career, Starr said he should never have accepted the position, since he had so little experience.

Starr wasn't all that great at Alabama.  He worked to become an All Pro and HOF QB.  The Packers dynasty of the sixties came at the time when TV was making pro football into the national pastime, replacing baseball.  The Pack became the first TV NFL dynasty. Starr was a fine ambassador for the team, and the sport.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2019, 07:12:43 PM by Gregg »

Offline Hands

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2019, 06:58:09 PM »

Starr was a great QB, husband, family man, who had strong Christian values. He took the Pack to a place that's still never been duplicated....3 straight championships.


In my book about the Green Bay Legend, James Clifton....I talked to two old football coaches about the QB position. They said the QB position is about footwork and brains. Arm strength was secondary.
Both guys brought out film on Starr. It was always look at his feet not his arm.
My absolute favorite game of his was their 66 NFL Dallas championship game in the Cotton Bowl. His control, stats, and fire pushed the Packers to their first SB.

I heard later that Lombardi was toying with developing an offense like the WCO. That part was only whispers, but made for great discussions.
In the land of the blind.....the one eye man is king!

Offline RT

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2019, 09:00:04 PM »
Bart Starr. Heroic. Iconic. Legendary.


Offline SET4YRS

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2019, 10:02:37 PM »
 Sad day, he was great in so many ways.

Offline Bignutz

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2019, 04:29:29 AM »
Jim Taylor, Forestt Gregg, Mcarthur Lane, now Starr.  They are slipping away. Makes me feel old.
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Online B

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2019, 05:07:39 AM »
....

Starr wasn't all that great at Alabama.  He worked to become an All Pro and HOF QB.  The Packers dynasty of the sixties came at the time when TV was making pro football into the national pastime, replacing baseball.  The Pack became the first TV NFL dynasty. Starr was a fine ambassador for the team, and the sport.

Bart was a game time QB - he didn't always look like the greatest athlete, but he was a great leader who got it done .

His college career at Alabama  was deeply effected by a serious back injury in a hazing incident after his sophmore season (which he covered up) - which cost him his Junior season and affected him the rest of his career. He start out at Alabama with a bang though, coming in to the Orange Bowl in relief as a freshman and completing 8 of 12 passes for 93 yards and a touchdown.

His sophomore year as Alabama, Starr was their starting quarterback, safety and punter - in a 6–2–3 season. Ironically, Bart's punting average of 41.4 yards per punt ranked 2nd in the nation in 1953, behind Zeke Bratkowski. In Bart's final season at Alabama, he and virtually the whole senior class were benched by a new Head Coach and his youth movement.

Starr never complained, instead he took what he called a blessing, being drafted in the 17th round by the Green Bay Packers to a Hall of Fame career which included:
 ~~ winning 2 Super Bowl championships (I, II)
 ~~ twice being Super Bowl MVP (I, II)
 ~~ winning 5 NFL championships (1961, 62, 65, 66, 67)
 ~~ NFL Most Valuable Player (1966)
 ~~ 5× NFL passer rating leader (1962, 64, 66, 68, 69)...

Like I said a great football player and even a greater man.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 05:10:34 AM by B »
The Green Bay Packers never lost a football game.
They just ran out of time.
-Vince Lombardi

Offline Gregg

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2019, 11:26:01 AM »
Glad you brought that up B.

The guy who decided to draft Starr was Jack Vainisi who was essentially the whole  scouting staff before Lombardi got to GB.

He was way ahead of his time because most scouts relied upon press clippings and All American lists back then, which is how someone like Terry Baker got drafted number one.

Jack actually traveled around the country and talked to coaches and kept notebooks, which were cross indexed, on every player he scouted.  When he went to Alabama the basketball coach, who helped out in football, is the guy who recommended Starr to him.  Even though Starr had played little as a junior and senior for reasons stated above by B. So Vainisi drafted him in the 17th round.  Starr did not think he would make the team, especially after they gave him the number 42 his first year.  But when Vainisi maneuvered to get Lombardi to replace McLean, that is when Starr became the starting quarterback.  As Paul Hornung said about Starr, he did not have the strongest arm in the league, but up to forty yards, he was as accurate as anyone in the NFL. His passing efficiency rating was excellent for that era. The other things he had were intelligence, good feet, and leadership qualities.

Vainisi died young at age 33 of a heart attack. He is still overlooked as a keystone to the sixties glory years of the Packers. He drafted eight future Hall of Famers which is a truly outstanding record considering he held the job for only ten years. The year he drafted Starr, he also drafted Forrest Gregg, Bob Skoronski and Hank Greminger.  Thanks to the Maraniss book he finally began to get the recognition he deserved.  Today I understand he has a likeness outside the stadium. Long overdue.  Starr would not have been in Green Bay without him.  Neither would Lomdardi.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 11:29:03 AM by Gregg »

Online B

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2019, 05:25:28 PM »
  goodpost Gregg

Exactly, his accuracy led to 5 NFL championships, only losing one playoff game as a Pro. And, Starr holds the all-time record for NFL playoff passer rating at 104.8, a full two points above the next closest player, Kurt Warner. Starr isn't alone in the top five as a Packer, as Aaron Rodgers holds down the fifth overall spot at 99.4.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 05:28:12 PM by B »
The Green Bay Packers never lost a football game.
They just ran out of time.
-Vince Lombardi

Online The GM

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2019, 05:27:02 PM »
Glad you brought that up B.

The guy who decided to draft Starr was Jack Vainisi who was essentially the whole  scouting staff before Lombardi got to GB.

He was way ahead of his time because most scouts relied upon press clippings and All American lists back then, which is how someone like Terry Baker got drafted number one.

Jack actually traveled around the country and talked to coaches and kept notebooks, which were cross indexed, on every player he scouted.  When he went to Alabama the basketball coach, who helped out in football, is the guy who recommended Starr to him.  Even though Starr had played little as a junior and senior for reasons stated above by B. So Vainisi drafted him in the 17th round.  Starr did not think he would make the team, especially after they gave him the number 42 his first year.  But when Vainisi maneuvered to get Lombardi to replace McLean, that is when Starr became the starting quarterback.  As Paul Hornung said about Starr, he did not have the strongest arm in the league, but up to forty yards, he was as accurate as anyone in the NFL. His passing efficiency rating was excellent for that era. The other things he had were intelligence, good feet, and leadership qualities.

Vainisi died young at age 33 of a heart attack. He is still overlooked as a keystone to the sixties glory years of the Packers. He drafted eight future Hall of Famers which is a truly outstanding record considering he held the job for only ten years. The year he drafted Starr, he also drafted Forrest Gregg, Bob Skoronski and Hank Greminger.  Thanks to the Maraniss book he finally began to get the recognition he deserved.  Today I understand he has a likeness outside the stadium. Long overdue.  Starr would not have been in Green Bay without him.  Neither would Lomdardi.

Bart Starr would jog past our house back when he was the HC.  Always waved as he went by if we were outside.  Always saw his wife Cherry at the grocery store with the big tan Lincoln Continental with the "N15" license plate.  Great people.  If there was a Mr Packer of all time, Bart Starr would get a lot of votes.   Set a standard both on and off the field. 


Spot on about Vainisi.  You could easily make a case for him in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.  He drafted numerous Hall of famers, and only recently have the modern GMs gotten the HOF recognition for their teams.  Long before computers, youtube, and combines, Vainisi built that Packer dynasty by pounding the pavement.  He was a major player in getting Lombardi to Green Bay and Lombardi highly respected Vainisi's talent.   Lombardi likely wouldn't have come without Vainisi's role in Green Bay.   As Gregg mention Vainisi died in 1960, and he never he saw a Packer playoff win or the dynasty he helped build.   After his death in 1960, Vainisi left a list of college players who he liked, and mentioned a particular one to Lombardi many times.   In the 1961 draft, Lombardi took that player who Vainisi strongly recommended prior to his death.   His name was Herb Adderley, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.  I'd put Vainisi's record of personnel against any GM of yesterday or today. 
 iult a lot of those   

Online craig

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2019, 07:25:25 PM »
Thanks for info about Vanisi and the Starr draft.  Really fascinating.  I didn't know any of that. 

So this guy Vanissi died at 33, but was **the** team scout for ten years?  So, does that mean that they turned over the scouting to a single 23-year-old guy? Wow, what a different world, huh? 

Online The GM

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Re: RIP Bart Starr
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2019, 07:46:27 PM »
Thanks for info about Vanisi and the Starr draft.  Really fascinating.  I didn't know any of that. 

So this guy Vanissi died at 33, but was **the** team scout for ten years?  So, does that mean that they turned over the scouting to a single 23-year-old guy? Wow, what a different world, huh?

Yep, I read he had really really bad eating habits.   Lombardi really respected him and knew him when Lombardi was with the Giants.   Vainisi recommended Lombardi to Packer President Dom Olenicheck (spelling way off) and part of the lure of Lombardi to Green Bay was knowing that Vainisi was in Green Bay.  He never got credit for what he did.  I dont know if there was a head scout or person who put that many players in the HOF?  It would be interesting to find out but he did it in such a short time.