November 19, 2019, 08:49:47 PM

Author Topic: lessons learned - Detroit game  (Read 1081 times)

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Offline RT

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2019, 06:19:37 AM »


3.) It is probably unknown to most, but the Packers run defense is a different animal with Montravius Adams in the lineup.

 

Welcome to the club that was started after the loss to Philly. Apparently, mid-round picks can, indeed, make a difference.

As an educator I would think your reading comprehension would be better than that. Adams is in his 3rd season and it has taken 3 seasons for him to become a factor for the Packers. The original discussion was about using a mid round pick to fix a run defense NEXT year. It is rare and flawed thinking to think that any position will be fixed by a mid round pick as a rookie. And yes it has happened, but just not wise to count on it.

Offline flowerpac

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2019, 06:25:54 AM »
Baktiari has been chugging to many beers.  Does not look good seeing him chug beers during the Bucks games.  Isn't good for minors to see this.

Online ricky

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2019, 08:20:12 AM »
As an educator I would think your reading comprehension would be better than that. Adams is in his 3rd season and it has taken 3 seasons for him to become a factor for the Packers. The original discussion was about using a mid round pick to fix a run defense NEXT year. It is rare and flawed thinking to think that any position will be fixed by a mid round pick as a rookie. And yes it has happened, but just not wise to count on it.

Re-read the posts. There was a mixture of "Adams could help" and "may need to draft someone in the middle rounds". Thanks for the correction. However, the return of M. Adams has boosted the run defense. But Bakhtiari slipping? Six penalties and one sack allowed in 411 snaps this season. Could this be better? Sure. But according to PFF, this is considered "elite". And no, not just stats, but the eye test says that DB is the still the real deal, IMO.
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Offline Whiskey Sam

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2019, 08:41:59 AM »
Rodgers wasn't the only person upset with the WR's inability to catch the ball. AR's accuracy was terrific- and let's give the OL major props for keeping the Lions DL a non-factor. But the dropped balls, the bobbling- it was inexcusable. Notice that the defense stepped up big time against the run. However, they are still susceptible to big passing plays. And the Lions' use of the hurry up offense caught the defense unawares at least twice. The return of J. Williams was really big. He's that guy who just does those little things that boost the team: a key block, a catch for a first down in a tight situation, getting those tough yards on third and short. And his stopping short of the goal line to keep the clock running was just really head's up, situational awareness football.

Did anyone else notice that after the Shepard fumble on the punt, the Packers left him kept on using him to return kickoffs? And that the Lions deliberately (I believe) kicked the ball short so he would have a chance to return the ball, and the Lions would have a chance at getting him to fumble again. Meanwhile, on the Williams long run, when he was about to get hit, he wrapped both arms around the ball before contact, making a fumble much less likely. It's the small things that can add up.

I disagree on Rodgers' accuracy. Rodgers is getting a pass on the drops, but they're not all the WRs' fault.
  • On the wide open missed TD to Jones the ball was underthrown and on the wrong side of him. Jones had to reach up behind his head for the ball. He probably would have been better off turning back towards the football instead of reaching back, but he shouldn't have had to. An accurate throw should have hit him in stride for an easy TD. Catchable pass? Yes, but made more difficult, especially for a RB, by an inaccurate throw.
  • Shepherd's INT was thrown behind him. He turned out towards the sidelines, and the ball was thrown inside. When he tried to adjust he lost his footing. Now did Shepherd turn the wrong way on his route? Were he and Rodgers not on the same page? Unknown, but the ball was thrown behind him based on where he was going. Catchable pass? Yes, but once Shepherd lost his footing that's not an easy catch
  • The bomb to MVS was a big play, but MVS had his man beat and had to slow up because the ball was underthrown. That allowed the DB a chance to break it up. If the ball hits MVS in stride, it has the potential to be a TD, and it's at least the third time this season Rodgers has underthrown MVS when he's gotten behind the defense. Catchable pass? Yes, but contested and no potential for a TD
  • The play that ended Allison's night the pass was low and too far ahead of him leading to Allison lunging for it and being exposed to the hit that knocked him out. If the throw hits him in the hands/chest in stride, it's likely a completion and Allison doesn't get knocked out by a helmet to helmet hit. Catchable pass? No


The throw to Lazard was an absolute, perfect throw. Rodgers is in the neighborhood with his throws, but he's erratic because of his poor mechanics. Every now and then there's a pinpoint throw that hits the WR in stride, but often they're underthrown or off target enough the WR has to adjust and stop/slow up which limits the YAC.
 

Offline Whiskey Sam

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2019, 11:15:37 AM »
Watching some clips, another beautiful throw was the one moving to his left that Rodgers laid right in Graham's hands in the end zone only for Graham to drop it. At this point, does Graham deserve to be on the field at all? Lewis seems to have better hands, and anyone else at TE would seemingly be an improvement.

Online The GM

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2019, 11:41:00 AM »
Graham can get open and make catches but his jump ball and in traffic is where he gets into problems.  He did make a nice catch on Monday and got hit pretty goo.  Way too soft IMO. 

Offline scoremore

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2019, 12:59:06 PM »
I agree Graham looks soft.  Looks like he lost his legs too.  Couldn't break a tackle for the first down was pathetic.  Not what you expect from your TE.  Disappointed in him would be an understatement.  The dude needs to start playing more physical.  Lewis on the other hand has been very solid.  Hopefully we'll get Toynan back into the mix soon. 

Offline Shinesman

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2019, 09:41:48 PM »
Rodgers wasn't the only person upset with the WR's inability to catch the ball. AR's accuracy was terrific- and let's give the OL major props for keeping the Lions DL a non-factor. But the dropped balls, the bobbling- it was inexcusable. Notice that the defense stepped up big time against the run. However, they are still susceptible to big passing plays. And the Lions' use of the hurry up offense caught the defense unawares at least twice. The return of J. Williams was really big. He's that guy who just does those little things that boost the team: a key block, a catch for a first down in a tight situation, getting those tough yards on third and short. And his stopping short of the goal line to keep the clock running was just really head's up, situational awareness football.

Did anyone else notice that after the Shepard fumble on the punt, the Packers left him kept on using him to return kickoffs? And that the Lions deliberately (I believe) kicked the ball short so he would have a chance to return the ball, and the Lions would have a chance at getting him to fumble again. Meanwhile, on the Williams long run, when he was about to get hit, he wrapped both arms around the ball before contact, making a fumble much less likely. It's the small things that can add up.

I disagree on Rodgers' accuracy. Rodgers is getting a pass on the drops, but they're not all the WRs' fault.
  • On the wide open missed TD to Jones the ball was underthrown and on the wrong side of him. Jones had to reach up behind his head for the ball. He probably would have been better off turning back towards the football instead of reaching back, but he shouldn't have had to. An accurate throw should have hit him in stride for an easy TD. Catchable pass? Yes, but made more difficult, especially for a RB, by an inaccurate throw.
  • Shepherd's INT was thrown behind him. He turned out towards the sidelines, and the ball was thrown inside. When he tried to adjust he lost his footing. Now did Shepherd turn the wrong way on his route? Were he and Rodgers not on the same page? Unknown, but the ball was thrown behind him based on where he was going. Catchable pass? Yes, but once Shepherd lost his footing that's not an easy catch
  • The bomb to MVS was a big play, but MVS had his man beat and had to slow up because the ball was underthrown. That allowed the DB a chance to break it up. If the ball hits MVS in stride, it has the potential to be a TD, and it's at least the third time this season Rodgers has underthrown MVS when he's gotten behind the defense. Catchable pass? Yes, but contested and no potential for a TD
  • The play that ended Allison's night the pass was low and too far ahead of him leading to Allison lunging for it and being exposed to the hit that knocked him out. If the throw hits him in the hands/chest in stride, it's likely a completion and Allison doesn't get knocked out by a helmet to helmet hit. Catchable pass? No


The throw to Lazard was an absolute, perfect throw. Rodgers is in the neighborhood with his throws, but he's erratic because of his poor mechanics. Every now and then there's a pinpoint throw that hits the WR in stride, but often they're underthrown or off target enough the WR has to adjust and stop/slow up which limits the YAC.

That throw to Jones was about as good as you could ask for. As a former WR, you cant expect more than turning over your left shoulder and the ball on target to hit you in the face. Jones just got discombobulated and let the ball go right through his hands.
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Offline Whiskey Sam

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2019, 06:58:29 AM »
Rodgers wasn't the only person upset with the WR's inability to catch the ball. AR's accuracy was terrific- and let's give the OL major props for keeping the Lions DL a non-factor. But the dropped balls, the bobbling- it was inexcusable. Notice that the defense stepped up big time against the run. However, they are still susceptible to big passing plays. And the Lions' use of the hurry up offense caught the defense unawares at least twice. The return of J. Williams was really big. He's that guy who just does those little things that boost the team: a key block, a catch for a first down in a tight situation, getting those tough yards on third and short. And his stopping short of the goal line to keep the clock running was just really head's up, situational awareness football.

Did anyone else notice that after the Shepard fumble on the punt, the Packers left him kept on using him to return kickoffs? And that the Lions deliberately (I believe) kicked the ball short so he would have a chance to return the ball, and the Lions would have a chance at getting him to fumble again. Meanwhile, on the Williams long run, when he was about to get hit, he wrapped both arms around the ball before contact, making a fumble much less likely. It's the small things that can add up.

I disagree on Rodgers' accuracy. Rodgers is getting a pass on the drops, but they're not all the WRs' fault.
  • On the wide open missed TD to Jones the ball was underthrown and on the wrong side of him. Jones had to reach up behind his head for the ball. He probably would have been better off turning back towards the football instead of reaching back, but he shouldn't have had to. An accurate throw should have hit him in stride for an easy TD. Catchable pass? Yes, but made more difficult, especially for a RB, by an inaccurate throw.
  • Shepherd's INT was thrown behind him. He turned out towards the sidelines, and the ball was thrown inside. When he tried to adjust he lost his footing. Now did Shepherd turn the wrong way on his route? Were he and Rodgers not on the same page? Unknown, but the ball was thrown behind him based on where he was going. Catchable pass? Yes, but once Shepherd lost his footing that's not an easy catch
  • The bomb to MVS was a big play, but MVS had his man beat and had to slow up because the ball was underthrown. That allowed the DB a chance to break it up. If the ball hits MVS in stride, it has the potential to be a TD, and it's at least the third time this season Rodgers has underthrown MVS when he's gotten behind the defense. Catchable pass? Yes, but contested and no potential for a TD
  • The play that ended Allison's night the pass was low and too far ahead of him leading to Allison lunging for it and being exposed to the hit that knocked him out. If the throw hits him in the hands/chest in stride, it's likely a completion and Allison doesn't get knocked out by a helmet to helmet hit. Catchable pass? No


The throw to Lazard was an absolute, perfect throw. Rodgers is in the neighborhood with his throws, but he's erratic because of his poor mechanics. Every now and then there's a pinpoint throw that hits the WR in stride, but often they're underthrown or off target enough the WR has to adjust and stop/slow up which limits the YAC.

That throw to Jones was about as good as you could ask for. As a former WR, you cant expect more than turning over your left shoulder and the ball on target to hit you in the face. Jones just got discombobulated and let the ball go right through his hands.

Jones is a RB, though. The throw could have been better, especially considering Rodgers wasn't under pressure. That doesn't excuse Jones for not adjusting to the ball, but compare where that ball is to the one Graham dropped. Graham's is leading him and right in his hands. Totally on Graham. The one to Jones is underthrown and towards his back shoulder instead of leading him. Rodgers and Jones share some blame on that one.

Offline ChicagoPackerFan

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #24 on: October 17, 2019, 08:26:49 AM »
Rodgers has looked pretty solid this year, no QB throws perfect passes on every play. Receivers need to make those non perfect catches.
Also I don't think Rodgers has thrown a interception that wasn't bobbled or tipped so far this year, that is a very big deal.

Offline Shinesman

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Re: lessons learned - Detroit game
« Reply #25 on: October 17, 2019, 07:27:12 PM »
Rodgers wasn't the only person upset with the WR's inability to catch the ball. AR's accuracy was terrific- and let's give the OL major props for keeping the Lions DL a non-factor. But the dropped balls, the bobbling- it was inexcusable. Notice that the defense stepped up big time against the run. However, they are still susceptible to big passing plays. And the Lions' use of the hurry up offense caught the defense unawares at least twice. The return of J. Williams was really big. He's that guy who just does those little things that boost the team: a key block, a catch for a first down in a tight situation, getting those tough yards on third and short. And his stopping short of the goal line to keep the clock running was just really head's up, situational awareness football.

Did anyone else notice that after the Shepard fumble on the punt, the Packers left him kept on using him to return kickoffs? And that the Lions deliberately (I believe) kicked the ball short so he would have a chance to return the ball, and the Lions would have a chance at getting him to fumble again. Meanwhile, on the Williams long run, when he was about to get hit, he wrapped both arms around the ball before contact, making a fumble much less likely. It's the small things that can add up.

I disagree on Rodgers' accuracy. Rodgers is getting a pass on the drops, but they're not all the WRs' fault.
  • On the wide open missed TD to Jones the ball was underthrown and on the wrong side of him. Jones had to reach up behind his head for the ball. He probably would have been better off turning back towards the football instead of reaching back, but he shouldn't have had to. An accurate throw should have hit him in stride for an easy TD. Catchable pass? Yes, but made more difficult, especially for a RB, by an inaccurate throw.
  • Shepherd's INT was thrown behind him. He turned out towards the sidelines, and the ball was thrown inside. When he tried to adjust he lost his footing. Now did Shepherd turn the wrong way on his route? Were he and Rodgers not on the same page? Unknown, but the ball was thrown behind him based on where he was going. Catchable pass? Yes, but once Shepherd lost his footing that's not an easy catch
  • The bomb to MVS was a big play, but MVS had his man beat and had to slow up because the ball was underthrown. That allowed the DB a chance to break it up. If the ball hits MVS in stride, it has the potential to be a TD, and it's at least the third time this season Rodgers has underthrown MVS when he's gotten behind the defense. Catchable pass? Yes, but contested and no potential for a TD
  • The play that ended Allison's night the pass was low and too far ahead of him leading to Allison lunging for it and being exposed to the hit that knocked him out. If the throw hits him in the hands/chest in stride, it's likely a completion and Allison doesn't get knocked out by a helmet to helmet hit. Catchable pass? No


The throw to Lazard was an absolute, perfect throw. Rodgers is in the neighborhood with his throws, but he's erratic because of his poor mechanics. Every now and then there's a pinpoint throw that hits the WR in stride, but often they're underthrown or off target enough the WR has to adjust and stop/slow up which limits the YAC.

That throw to Jones was about as good as you could ask for. As a former WR, you cant expect more than turning over your left shoulder and the ball on target to hit you in the face. Jones just got discombobulated and let the ball go right through his hands.

Jones is a RB, though. The throw could have been better, especially considering Rodgers wasn't under pressure. That doesn't excuse Jones for not adjusting to the ball, but compare where that ball is to the one Graham dropped. Graham's is leading him and right in his hands. Totally on Graham. The one to Jones is underthrown and towards his back shoulder instead of leading him. Rodgers and Jones share some blame on that one.

He is a RB, but that's not a difficult catch to make. Even for a runner. He knew it, thats why he had such a self-disappointed reaction.
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