November 19, 2019, 08:00:32 PM

Author Topic: What we learned from the Panthers  (Read 874 times)

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Offline marklawrence

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What we learned from the Panthers
« on: November 10, 2019, 04:52:26 PM »
1. We continue to have problems with our run defense.
2. Our defense must gel and improve if we're going to get anywhere in the off season.
3. The offense continues to improve and is on a good path, IMHO.
4. @SF is now officially huge. We're fighting for a bye week and possibly for home field. I think this team needs home field. Or at least a fire lit under their butts.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 04:53:25 PM by marklawrence »
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Offline BIG LEGEND

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2019, 05:02:41 PM »
I only disagree with one thing - I don't see this defense improving. Of course holding onto interceptions would help, as would cutting down on missed tackles.

The defense will only be as good as the pass rush pressure

Online The GM

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2019, 05:12:31 PM »
Rookie HC mistake not to take the FG before the half. Almost came back to bite them. Put the points on the board and get the ball first in the second half.

Online ricky

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2019, 05:27:22 PM »
Rookie HC mistake not to take the FG before the half. Almost came back to bite them. Put the points on the board and get the ball first in the second half.

No guts, no glory. Putting your trust in the ability of the OL to win their battles and give Williams a chance to bull his way in showed he trusted his guys to do the job. They didn't. Whether because they were thrown off by Rodgers count, or just weren't quite as quick as the Panthers on that play is debatable. But getting a TD at that point, and then doubling up with the second half kickoff would have been a real statement by the offense.

Why did the offense stop running the ball and resort to longer passes? Was this on AR or MLF? Because the running game was simply gashing the Panthers D. The team was in a rhythm, the OL was gaining confidence, the chains were being moved and the clock was going down. All good for the Packers. Then stop everything and throw longer passes, rather than those shorter, move the chains/burn the clock passes. Who is making these decisions?

« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 05:33:16 PM by ricky »
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Offline MrJuly4th

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2019, 05:30:48 PM »
Rookie HC mistake not to take the FG before the half. Almost came back to bite them. Put the points on the board and get the ball first in the second half.

No guts, no glory. Putting your trust in the ability of the OL to win their battles and give Williams a chance to bull his way in showed he trusted his guys to do the job. They didn't. Whether because they were thrown off by Rodgers count, or just weren't quite as quick as the Panthers on that play is debatable. But getting a TD at that point, and then doubling up with the second half kickoff would have been a real statement by the offense.

A high school or college coach goes for the TD with 2 seconds on the clock while and NFL coach realizes that this is the NFL and all points matter.   Did we not learn from the Philly game?   

Offline MrJuly4th

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2019, 05:36:51 PM »
Where have you been Marquez Valdes-Scantling?    I haven't seen you a long time. 

Online ricky

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2019, 05:37:47 PM »
A high school or college coach goes for the TD with 2 seconds on the clock while and NFL coach realizes that this is the NFL and all points matter.   Did we not learn from the Philly game?

Maybe. And actually, I was thinking about the Philly game while posting. They'd get a few yards from the goal line, and then stop everything and throw passes. Instead they settled for FG's. They were partially forced to do this because they had lost Williams early in the game on a cheap shot by Philly. Being aggressive is not always bad.
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Offline MrJuly4th

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2019, 05:43:24 PM »
A high school or college coach goes for the TD with 2 seconds on the clock while and NFL coach realizes that this is the NFL and all points matter.   Did we not learn from the Philly game?

Maybe. And actually, I was thinking about the Philly game while posting. They'd get a few yards from the goal line, and then stop everything and throw passes. Instead they settled for FG's. They were partially forced to do this because they had lost Williams early in the game on a cheap shot by Philly. Being aggressive is not always bad.

But in the case and the Philly case, it was.  Please MLF, learn from your mistakes. 

Online The GM

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2019, 06:44:27 PM »
What I learned from Monday Night Football tonight and the past few weekends is Randall Cobb's new name is "Former Green Bay Packer Randall Cobb".  Hes not known as Randall Cobb anymore.

The other thing is: Welcome to the Green Bay Packers Jimmy Graham.  Hope to see more of you in the coming months.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 07:23:43 PM by The GM »

Offline BartyorBarrySmith

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2019, 09:34:21 PM »
What I don't understand is why they sit Adams around the goal line.  He's so dynamic and such great feet and ability to create space that I can't see why the run him off on any play.  Felt that way when he wasn't available after his injury vs. Philly that it really hurt them all the time but especially in the red zone.

Offline ChicagoPackerFan

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2019, 06:22:42 AM »
Rodgers was frustrating to watch this game same old bad tendencies, throwing too many low percentage deep throws and letting the damn clock wind down to one second on virtually every play. 

It drives me crazy watching the clock click down... 5, 4 ,3 ,2, 1 , .5 second and snap the ball. Plus the defense knows when the ball is going to be snapped.

Online ricky

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2019, 09:28:34 AM »
Rodgers was frustrating to watch this game same old bad tendencies, throwing too many low percentage deep throws and letting the damn clock wind down to one second on virtually every play. 

It drives me crazy watching the clock click down... 5, 4 ,3 ,2, 1 , .5 second and snap the ball. Plus the defense knows when the ball is going to be snapped.

Only if they're watching the clock. This also gives Rodgers time to assess the defense, make adjustments, and generally be the field coach. What bothers me more is he always seems to get the snap after shouting "Three, Nineteen". Maybe a hut or two afterward, perhaps to catch the defense offside for a free play, or maybe just habit at this point. But, yeah, the low percentage long throws are a problem. The thing is, the throws are generally close enough so the receiver does have a chance. Catch the ball, even if it's a difficult grab because a defender is really close, and you've got a big play. 
"My hopes are not always realized, but I always hope." Ovid

Offline packlaw

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2019, 10:07:50 AM »
I learned that this team has some luck - it received some payback for the penalties last year of roughing the passer-by Mathews.  It rose to the occasion on the final play, but should never have been in that position in the first place.  Ergo, field goal at the end of the half, better rush defense, better coverage over the middle.  The defense still cannot contain the run and still cannot cover a tight end or the middle of the field.  Too much man to man and not enough cover two?  Bend and don't break will not cut it against playoff-bound teams.  San Francisco will be litmus test on how we will fare in the playoffs.  The team needs the bye and a restructuring of the defense for the final push.   

Online craig

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2019, 10:28:21 AM »
Charmed again.  Yesterday was another case where the Packers were sufficiently competitive to win, with benefit of a 2-turnover differential.   

Another game where we punted more than did the opposition, but we still won. 

Offline ChicagoPackerFan

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Re: What we learned from the Panthers
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2019, 10:59:27 AM »
Rodgers was frustrating to watch this game same old bad tendencies, throwing too many low percentage deep throws and letting the damn clock wind down to one second on virtually every play. 

It drives me crazy watching the clock click down... 5, 4 ,3 ,2, 1 , .5 second and snap the ball. Plus the defense knows when the ball is going to be snapped.

Only if they're watching the clock. This also gives Rodgers time to assess the defense, make adjustments, and generally be the field coach. What bothers me more is he always seems to get the snap after shouting "Three, Nineteen". Maybe a hut or two afterward, perhaps to catch the defense offside for a free play, or maybe just habit at this point. But, yeah, the low percentage long throws are a problem. The thing is, the throws are generally close enough so the receiver does have a chance. Catch the ball, even if it's a difficult grab because a defender is really close, and you've got a big play.

Yes I see why he likes running the clock down, I'd just like to see them mix it up get in more series were they have a quick tempo to the game.
Plus every game they seem use up time outs because they run out of time or get called for delay of game. And its funny, Rodgers is drawing his own team off sides and not the opponent. I like the big pass play just not on a critical third down, lets just keep moving the chains and take the higher percentage shorter throws. It seems like he gets frustrated sometimes and goes for the big play.